9 Things to Do the First Day in Your New Home

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Homes are selling and people are moving every day. Buyers and sellers are packing up all their worldly goods, labeling the boxes and hiring movers to deliver them to their new homes. That’s pretty much all there is to it right?
Could be, but there are some important steps to take on your first day in a new home.
  1. Make your bed. At the end of the day when you’re dead tired, you’ll be happy to fall into clean sheets and a blanket.
  2. Set up your bathroom with all your personal items and towels. Make it easy to refresh yourself in the morning and get ready to face another day of unpacking or go to work.
  3. Change the locks, have spare keys made. People always make extra sets of keys, so it is important for security to change the locks as quickly as possible. It’s also a good idea to leave spare keys with a trusted friend of family member.
  4. Check the smoke detectors. Are the batteries working? Replace them with new batteries, just to be on the safe side.
  5. Find your circuit breaker and make sure you know what each switch controls.
  6. Learn where the main shutoff is for the water. During your inspection the inspector should have shown you the location. If something springs a leak or overflows, you’ll need to be able to turn the water off immediately.
  7. Check any boxes of things you had moved and marked as fragile. Mark it on the movers’ inventory and don’t sign for any shipment until you’ve checked those valuables. Leave it in the box, take photos and contact the moving company right away. Deadlines to file claims for damage vary by state.
  8. Run a phantom load in the dishwasher, washing machine and dryer. You’ll feel better knowing you’ve run a clean cycle through and everything works for when you’ll need it.
  9. Replace the furnace filters. This is simple, but may not have been on the mind of the previous homeowner and may not be on yours. A furnace filter protects the furnace and fan and minimizes the amount of dust on the heating and cooling coil. It’s the most basic and inexpensive way to maintain your furnace and easy to forget.

by Carolyn Staven

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